Flying & Moral Panics

I have never enjoyed flying. Although I would stop short of saying that I have a fear of flying – after you have been in a small plane flown by your wife who has never flown one before, you tend to put trust in the capable hands of a professional pilot.

However, that is kind of the problem we are being reminded of by the media – you can’t.

The awful, tragic news of Germanwings flight 4U 9225 quickly moved it’s focus from the news of the incident itself to the apparent murder-suicide of the co-pilot, Andreas Lubitz.

As a society, we need someone to blame and as part of this, the media will also create a moral-panic (Cohen 1972), causing the proletariat (that’s me & you), to want to find out more about a certain event or linked events. Continue reading “Flying & Moral Panics”

MISE-EN-SCENE

Mise en scène encompasses the most recognizable attributes of a film – the setting and the actors; it includes costumes and make-up, props, and all the other natural and artificial details that characterize the spaces filmed.  The term is borrowed from a French theatrical expression, meaning roughly “put into the scene”.  In other words, mise-en-scène describes the stuff in the frame and the way it is shown and arranged.

Have a look at each of the scenes below.  What has been ‘put in the frame’ in each one, in order to help explain the narrative?

Answers in comments, as always;

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