Was it Facebook ‘wot won it’? – BBC News

Here’s an article I just read closely related to my post yesterday: Is the media responsible for Trump’s victory? (In a way you may not expect)

Is broadcast and print media not as influencial as it thinks it is?

Facebook played a large role in the US election, but Mark Zuckerberg is not engaging with claims that it helped Donald Trump win.

See below for the full article:

Source: Was it Facebook ‘wot won it’? – BBC News

A print publishing reality: advertisers, not readers, are the customers via The Guardian

As Trinity Mirror closes another free title while bemoaning a lack of audience, a US newspaper owner tells it like it is: journalism is of secondary importance

Further reading: Curran (1986) – In your theory booklet.

Curran (1986) argues that the advertising industry has a major influence on the structure and output of the British print media.  It is argued that media producers focus on providing the media for the sectors of the population that the advertising industry wants to address.  For many publications, advertising is the main source of revenue and therefore the advertisers could wield significant power in print publications and may affect the content; the use of sponsored promotions in magazines like Empire may seem harmless, but what if a newspaper was reluctant to print a story because it might upset one of their major advertisers?

Source: A print publishing reality: advertisers, not readers, are the customers | Media | The Guardian

Institutions and political allegiances

An important part of learning about institutions is that they tend to align with political parties. This can be for a number of reasons, but is mostly to please the dominant ideologies of their audience.

This is clear to see in this first image:

est-newspaper line.png

It is clear by looking at this that The Guardian is predominately read by a labour supporting audience (centre-left), whilst The Telegraph, in contrast, leans very much to the centre-right, supporting the Conservatives (Or Tories). Other observations; over a quarter of Daily Express readers support UKIP (quite obvious if you just look at the front page), along with The Star and there is not a single newspaper that has anything near a 50/50 labour/conservative split.

The history of such allegiances can be seen in the diagram below, with support shown in every general election from World War 2 until 2005, note how support from institutions – like audiences – tends to change to reflect the zeitgeist and ideologies of the era:

paper-political-choices-g-002.jpg

Only The Mirror and The Telegraph‘s support has remained consistent since the end of World War 2.

What other observations can be made, based on these two diagrams? Answers in the comments please.

Today’s Evening Standard

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Picked up the Evening Standard on the way home this evening (I was on a course ok?)

Alternative caption: This is a photo of two heads of state.🙄

What are your opinions of this?

  • Is there too much emphasis on the gender of these two politicians?
  • Does what they are wearing really matter?
  • Do the linguistic codes connote anything? A ‘First Lady’ is the traditional title for the wife of a head of state, e.g. Michelle Obama.
  • How does Hilary Clinton fit into all this? (No she’s not quite president, but when the opponent is Donald Trump…)

This is the critical awareness I would expect of an A-Level Media Studies student. Get out there and get critical!