Poundland ‘naughty’ elf ad deemed ‘irresponsible’ by regulator – BBC News

The social media campaign, which featured sexual references, breached the ASA code of practice.

Source: Poundland ‘naughty’ elf ad deemed ‘irresponsible’ by regulator – BBC News

Have another look at Livingstone & Lunt’s ideas on Media Regulation – Which can be found in the theorist poster on the wall or on StudentShare.

Do you agree or disagree with the ASA?

Textual Analysis Toolkit

Each type of text you will analyse is below, together with a list of things that could be analysed for it. Let me know in the comments in you think of any potential additions!

Advertising

Print

  • Codes and conventions
  • Layout and design
  • Composition
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif), colour
  • Mise-en-scène – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos etc.
  • Language – slogan/tagline and copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Moving image

  • Codes and conventions
  • Camera work – framing, shot types, angle, position, movement
  • Editing – pace, type of edits, continuity/montage Structure/narrative
  • Sound – music/dialogue/voiceover
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Music video

  • Codes and conventions – performance/narrative/experimental features
  • Camera work (framing – shot types, angle, position, movement)
  • Editing – beat-matched?
  • Elements of continuity/montage
  • How does the video interpret the music and/or lyrics?
  • Structure/narrative
  • Intertextuality
  • Sound
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Newspapers

  • Point of view and ideology
  • Codes and conventions of news products/newspapers/type of newspaper
  • Layout and design
  • Composition – positioning of headlines, images, columns, combination of stories
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif)
  • Mise-en-scène – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – headline, sub-headings, captions
  • Copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Television

  • Genre codes and conventions
  • Genre theory
  • Genre fluidity
  • Camera work – framing and composition shot types, angle, position, movement
  • Lighting and colour
  • Editing – pace, type of edits, continuity
  • Narrative construction, related to narrative theory
  • Sound – dialogue, music
  • Mise-en-scene – setting and location, props, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Magazines

  • Codes and conventions – changes over time?
  • Layout and design
  • Composition – positioning of masthead/headlines, cover lines, images, columns
  • Font size, type, colour
  • Images/photographs – shot type, angle, focus
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – headline, sub-headings, captions – mode of address
  • Copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Online media

  • Homepage and other pages
  • Codes and conventions
  • Layout and design
  • Composition
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif), colour
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – formal/informal mode of address?
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative/structure around the site
  • Interactive features
  • Menu bar and navigation – structure and design of the site

A print publishing reality: advertisers, not readers, are the customers via The Guardian

As Trinity Mirror closes another free title while bemoaning a lack of audience, a US newspaper owner tells it like it is: journalism is of secondary importance

Further reading: Curran (1986) – In your theory booklet.

Curran (1986) argues that the advertising industry has a major influence on the structure and output of the British print media.  It is argued that media producers focus on providing the media for the sectors of the population that the advertising industry wants to address.  For many publications, advertising is the main source of revenue and therefore the advertisers could wield significant power in print publications and may affect the content; the use of sponsored promotions in magazines like Empire may seem harmless, but what if a newspaper was reluctant to print a story because it might upset one of their major advertisers?

Source: A print publishing reality: advertisers, not readers, are the customers | Media | The Guardian