A print publishing reality: advertisers, not readers, are the customers via The Guardian

As Trinity Mirror closes another free title while bemoaning a lack of audience, a US newspaper owner tells it like it is: journalism is of secondary importance

Further reading: Curran (1986) – In your theory booklet.

Curran (1986) argues that the advertising industry has a major influence on the structure and output of the British print media.  It is argued that media producers focus on providing the media for the sectors of the population that the advertising industry wants to address.  For many publications, advertising is the main source of revenue and therefore the advertisers could wield significant power in print publications and may affect the content; the use of sponsored promotions in magazines like Empire may seem harmless, but what if a newspaper was reluctant to print a story because it might upset one of their major advertisers?

Source: A print publishing reality: advertisers, not readers, are the customers | Media | The Guardian

Institutions and political allegiances

An important part of learning about institutions is that they tend to align with political parties. This can be for a number of reasons, but is mostly to please the dominant ideologies of their audience.

This is clear to see in this first image:

est-newspaper line.png

It is clear by looking at this that The Guardian is predominately read by a labour supporting audience (centre-left), whilst The Telegraph, in contrast, leans very much to the centre-right, supporting the Conservatives (Or Tories). Other observations; over a quarter of Daily Express readers support UKIP (quite obvious if you just look at the front page), along with The Star and there is not a single newspaper that has anything near a 50/50 labour/conservative split.

The history of such allegiances can be seen in the diagram below, with support shown in every general election from World War 2 until 2005, note how support from institutions – like audiences – tends to change to reflect the zeitgeist and ideologies of the era:

paper-political-choices-g-002.jpg

Only The Mirror and The Telegraph‘s support has remained consistent since the end of World War 2.

What other observations can be made, based on these two diagrams? Answers in the comments please.

Thousands sign petition urging Channel 4 to drop Benefits Street.

Last one from the Guardian today.  Apparently thousands (31,440 at the time of writing) of people want the controversial show taken off the air.

“I’m concerned about how much hatred any further episode is going to create,” ~ former Birmingham bus driver Arshad Mahmood.

You can read the article here

And see the petition here

Benefits Street residents