Disney has finally caught up! first same-sex kiss and openly gay character

gay charactersDisney have finally aired their first same-sex kiss on one of their main channels. Despite Disney’s constant nods of support toward the LGBTQ community in several of their other media products. they have never openly shown a same -sex kiss. Disney have always shown their support of the LGBTQ community, in movies such as Finding dory and Good luck Charlie, where there are lesbian couples.

Despite Disney’s subtle support of the LGBTQ community they had never shown a same-sex kiss in any of their media products. Their first same-sex kiss was shown on the show ‘Star vs. the Forces of Evil’. The showing of this kiss on such a public channel means that the younger generation get to see the different types of people in society. As well as gain the confidence they need to be themselves from a young age. It is easier for Disney’s young audience to accept who they are if they are comfortable with same-sex relationships. Continue reading “Disney has finally caught up! first same-sex kiss and openly gay character”

Audiences – Hartley

This expands upon Burton’s classification of socially grouped audiences. He identifies 7 subjectives. If any of them apply to your audience, you have identified a more more specific audience and should offer motives appropriate to that audience. The more specific your audience, the more you can target them exactly. Continue reading “Audiences – Hartley”

Institutions and political allegiances

An important part of learning about institutions is that they tend to align with political parties. This can be for a number of reasons, but is mostly to please the dominant ideologies of their audience.

This is clear to see in this first image:

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It is clear by looking at this that The Guardian is predominately read by a labour supporting audience (centre-left), whilst The Telegraph, in contrast, leans very much to the centre-right, supporting the Conservatives (Or Tories). Other observations; over a quarter of Daily Express readers support UKIP (quite obvious if you just look at the front page), along with The Star and there is not a single newspaper that has anything near a 50/50 labour/conservative split.

The history of such allegiances can be seen in the diagram below, with support shown in every general election from World War 2 until 2005, note how support from institutions – like audiences – tends to change to reflect the zeitgeist and ideologies of the era:

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Only The Mirror and The Telegraph‘s support has remained consistent since the end of World War 2.

What other observations can be made, based on these two diagrams? Answers in the comments please.