Textual Analysis Toolkit

Each type of text you will analyse is below, together with a list of things that could be analysed for it. Let me know in the comments in you think of any potential additions!

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Print

  • Codes and conventions
  • Layout and design
  • Composition
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif), colour
  • Mise-en-scène – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos etc.
  • Language – slogan/tagline and copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Moving image

  • Codes and conventions
  • Camera work – framing, shot types, angle, position, movement
  • Editing – pace, type of edits, continuity/montage Structure/narrative
  • Sound – music/dialogue/voiceover
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Music video

  • Codes and conventions – performance/narrative/experimental features
  • Camera work (framing – shot types, angle, position, movement)
  • Editing – beat-matched?
  • Elements of continuity/montage
  • How does the video interpret the music and/or lyrics?
  • Structure/narrative
  • Intertextuality
  • Sound
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Newspapers

  • Point of view and ideology
  • Codes and conventions of news products/newspapers/type of newspaper
  • Layout and design
  • Composition – positioning of headlines, images, columns, combination of stories
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif)
  • Mise-en-scène – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – headline, sub-headings, captions
  • Copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Television

  • Genre codes and conventions
  • Genre theory
  • Genre fluidity
  • Camera work – framing and composition shot types, angle, position, movement
  • Lighting and colour
  • Editing – pace, type of edits, continuity
  • Narrative construction, related to narrative theory
  • Sound – dialogue, music
  • Mise-en-scene – setting and location, props, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Magazines

  • Codes and conventions – changes over time?
  • Layout and design
  • Composition – positioning of masthead/headlines, cover lines, images, columns
  • Font size, type, colour
  • Images/photographs – shot type, angle, focus
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – headline, sub-headings, captions – mode of address
  • Copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Online media

  • Homepage and other pages
  • Codes and conventions
  • Layout and design
  • Composition
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif), colour
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – formal/informal mode of address?
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative/structure around the site
  • Interactive features
  • Menu bar and navigation – structure and design of the site

AS & A2 Recommended Media Studies Theorists

Every theorist & theory you will ever need!!

Genre

  • John Fiske – genre as ‘convenience’ for producers and audiences – this means commercial success is underpinned by the conventions of genre in terms of what audiences expect.
  • Robert Stam – there are infinite genres. Basically here, Stam is advancing an A2 concept that there is an argument that genre no longer exists and we do not have to analyse text in terms of genre.
  • Jane Feuer – genre is abstract and becoming harder to identify.
  • Henry Jenkins – genre break rules and commonly hybridizes.
  • John Hartley – genre is interpreted culturally e.g. Coronation Street or Eastenders could only be understood in terms of the conventions of UK soap operas, American television dramas tend to have a slightly different set of conventions to British television dramas.
  • Daniel Chandler – genre is too restricting and presents audiences and producers with a creative ‘straightjacket’.
  • Steve Neale – genre as repetition and difference
  • David Buckingham – genre in constant process of negotiation and change
  • Rick Altman – genre offers audiences a ‘set of pleasures’

Continue reading “AS & A2 Recommended Media Studies Theorists”