Today’s Evening Standard

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Picked up the Evening Standard on the way home this evening (I was on a course ok?)

Alternative caption: This is a photo of two heads of state.🙄

What are your opinions of this?

  • Is there too much emphasis on the gender of these two politicians?
  • Does what they are wearing really matter?
  • Do the linguistic codes connote anything? A ‘First Lady’ is the traditional title for the wife of a head of state, e.g. Michelle Obama.
  • How does Hilary Clinton fit into all this? (No she’s not quite president, but when the opponent is Donald Trump…)

This is the critical awareness I would expect of an A-Level Media Studies student. Get out there and get critical!

 

Tabloid headlines without the sexism | Death and Taxes

Tabloid headlines without the sexism

There’s no question that celebrity tabloids are awful. It’s essentially a whole industry held up by casual sexism. To hilariously point this out, Vagenda Magazine asked Twitter followers to re-write recent tabloid headlines, omitting the sexism.

What results is a beautiful deconstruction of magazines that seem like relics of the ’50s. Check out a few of them at Tabloid headlines without the sexism | Death and Taxes.

Bechdel test

This is an easy test for you to try out on any media text that has at least 2 females in it. Bechdel test was introduced by an American cartoonist called Alison Bechdel in a 1985 strip. In the comic, the character points out the rule in relation to movies, however it is transferable to any text.

The rules for the Bechdel test are simple:

  1. It has to have at least two women in it,
  2. who talk to each other,
  3. about something besides a man.

Much to my surprise, many media texts don’t seem to fail to meet these simple requirements. I wonder if there were many in the last decade that do….