Textual Analysis Toolkit

Each type of text you will analyse is below, together with a list of things that could be analysed for it. Let me know in the comments in you think of any potential additions!

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Print

  • Codes and conventions
  • Layout and design
  • Composition
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif), colour
  • Mise-en-scène – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos etc.
  • Language – slogan/tagline and copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Moving image

  • Codes and conventions
  • Camera work – framing, shot types, angle, position, movement
  • Editing – pace, type of edits, continuity/montage Structure/narrative
  • Sound – music/dialogue/voiceover
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Music video

  • Codes and conventions – performance/narrative/experimental features
  • Camera work (framing – shot types, angle, position, movement)
  • Editing – beat-matched?
  • Elements of continuity/montage
  • How does the video interpret the music and/or lyrics?
  • Structure/narrative
  • Intertextuality
  • Sound
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Newspapers

  • Point of view and ideology
  • Codes and conventions of news products/newspapers/type of newspaper
  • Layout and design
  • Composition – positioning of headlines, images, columns, combination of stories
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif)
  • Mise-en-scène – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – headline, sub-headings, captions
  • Copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Television

  • Genre codes and conventions
  • Genre theory
  • Genre fluidity
  • Camera work – framing and composition shot types, angle, position, movement
  • Lighting and colour
  • Editing – pace, type of edits, continuity
  • Narrative construction, related to narrative theory
  • Sound – dialogue, music
  • Mise-en-scene – setting and location, props, costume/dress, hair/make-up

Magazines

  • Codes and conventions – changes over time?
  • Layout and design
  • Composition – positioning of masthead/headlines, cover lines, images, columns
  • Font size, type, colour
  • Images/photographs – shot type, angle, focus
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – headline, sub-headings, captions – mode of address
  • Copy
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative

Online media

  • Homepage and other pages
  • Codes and conventions
  • Layout and design
  • Composition
  • Font size, type of font (e.g. serif/sans serif), colour
  • Images/photographs – camera shot type, angle, focus
  • Mise-en-scene – colour, lighting, location, costume/dress, hair/make-up
  • Graphics, logos
  • Language – formal/informal mode of address?
  • Anchorage of images and text
  • Elements of narrative/structure around the site
  • Interactive features
  • Menu bar and navigation – structure and design of the site

What I should add to my Section B answer – Shiloh

My question for Part B was “Convergence allows audiences to access media content from multiple platforms on one device. Assess the impact of convergence in your cross-media study. My three products were Teen Wolf (Network: MTV), The Originals (Network: The CW) and American Horror Story (Network: FX).

I think I should include stereotypes and countertypes in my Section B answer. Stereotypes are a fixed cliché of a person or thing. For example, the saying that blonde people are dumb. This is stereotypical as not all blonde people are dumb. I believe this can be used in the Part B answer. For instance, for my three choices of the broadcasting platform, I could talk about how the genre of production is portrayed and how they relate to the generalisation of such shows. Countertypes are positive stereotypes that accentuate the positive attributes of someone. For instance, a countertype could be that blonde people are smart. This is a countertype as it accentuates the positivity that blonde-haired people are smart. I could talk about how countertypes are used to influence the audience into wanting to watch such shows and movies, and to increase the popularity of the shows so the audience talk about it to people who do not watch it, which can intrigue others to watch it.

Image result for ahs posterImage result Continue reading “What I should add to my Section B answer – Shiloh”

Are you a Sherlock fan?

Are you a Sherlock fan?

sherlockmagnusson

Talking about the just ended BBC One Series 3.

For those who are suffering in the so called cold turkey after the last episode Sunday gone, Empire decided to treat fans by revealing secrets from the series.

First up is based around the set, which you can get a nice panoramic view of here.

So if you want to know exactly how he fell off a building and survived, why the Mary reveal wasn’t predicted by audiences or even how the next series is panning out, go straight to 20 Sherlock Series 3 Secrets.